No justice, no peace – will ZOSO have any long-term effect?

In a 2016 update, INDECOM boss, Terrence Williams, usefully invokes Peter Tosh – “I don’t want no peace; I want equal rights and justice” . Rather than an ephemeral “peace” that comes from oppressive and arbitrary state agents, the solution to crime must be justice, says Williams. But what hope when ‘the Ministry of Justice has for 2016-17 been allocated just over $6 billion. The Ministry of National Security received almost 10 times that amount’.

ZOSO may lead temporarily to more a peaceful Mount Salem in St. James as the guns move elsewhere, but the root of the problem will remain, that is injustice in its wider social and economic (not just legal) sense.… Read on ...

STOP BAUXITE MINING IN THE COCKPIT COUNTRY!

Jamaica’s Cockpit Country is under immediate threat from bauxite mining, which would remove forest cover, block and pollute waterways, displace residents, threaten agricultural livelihoods, compromise air quality and threaten the health and well-being of thousands of Jamaican citizens.

The Cockpit Country is an irreplaceable region of limestone forest supporting a unique flora and fauna. In addition, and importantly, it is the major aquifer for rivers rising and flowing both to the north and southern coasts of the island. These rivers are associated with extensive cave systems which would also be lost or damaged by the proposed mining activities. In many cases knowledge of the underground connections of these river caves is fragmentary, thus making the impacts of mining activities on regional water supplies problematic.… Read on ...

Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico Needs Help, but not like Haiti in 2010
Haiti Support Group Chair Antony Stewart has written an article on why Haiti 2010 is not the intervention model you want for Puerto Rico.
read it here…
and
200 Academics Speak Out for Puerto Rico
The destruction brought by Hurricane Maria has exposed the profound colonial condition of Puerto Rico
read on …
and
Stand with Puerto Rico – Not the Banks
As a humanitarian crisis unfolds in America, we must finally begin to put people before profit.
more…Read on ...

‘1.5°C to stay alive’: climate change, imperialism and justice for the Caribbean

In the wake of the two recent hurricanes that have devastated parts of the Caribbean, Leon Sealey-Huggins of Warwick University has published an excellent article in Third World Quarterly. In the wake of the two recent hurricanes that have devastated parts of the Caribbean, Leon Sealey-Huggins of Warwick University has published an excellent article in Third World Quarterly. “What has happened this year has been terrible to watch,” says Dr Sealey-Huggins, “and what is of immediate concern now is the clear-up operation. There is a need for fast and direct help and support from the world. But it is also crucial that we take time now to set this in a wider historical and political context and listen to the Caribbean region – otherwise these kind of events will just keep happening in same, or worse, pattern of repeats,” he states.… Read on ...

Up Down Turn Around

The Political Economy of Slavery and the Socialist Case for Reparations
by Steve Cushion

A pamphlet from Caribbean Labour Solidarity

When British Prime Minister David Cameron visited Jamaica in September 2015, he ignored calls for an apology and reparations for the Transatlantic slave trade, instead offering £25 million to build a prison for Jamaicans currently serving sentences in the UK. The British government has a long history of such contempt for those victimised by slavery and the ongoing consequences to the descendants of people enslaved under the British Empire despite or, perhaps, because of the vast wealth that British capitalists extracted from the Caribbean during the 17th, 18th and early 19th centuries.… Read on ...

Killing Communists in Havana

The Start of the Cold War in Latin America
by Steve Cushion

The Cold War started early in Cuba, with anti-communist purges of the trade unions already under way by 1947. Corruption and government intervention succeeded in removing the left-wing leaders of many unions but, in those sectors where this approach failed, gunmen linked to the ruling party shot and killed a dozen leading trade union militants, including the General Secretary of the Cuban Sugar Workers’ Federation.

Based on material from the Cuban archives and confidential US State Department files, this SHS Occasional Publication examines the activities of the US government, the Mafia and the American Federation of Labor, as well as corrupt Cuban politicians and local gangsters, in this early episode of the Cold War.… Read on ...

Tivoli Gardens Massacre

On 24 May 2010, Jamaican police and military initiated a joint operation in the West Kingston community of Tivoli Gardens, to arrest Christopher Coke, wanted in the USA for drug and arm-trafficking charges. During the first two days of the operation, at least 74 people, including a member of the Jamaica Defence Force, were killed and at least 54 people injured. More than 40 of those killed in Tivoli Gardens are alleged to have been the victims of extra-judicial executions by the security forces. Two people reportedly taken into custody remain unaccounted for and may have been victims of enforced disappearance.… Read on ...