NGO crimes go far beyond Oxfam

Ten months after the earthquake in Haiti, protestors condemned NGOs and the U.N. for lack of shelter and basic services. The back of the man’s red T-shirt says in Creole, “Down with NGO thieves/ We want good houses to live in.” Nothing has changed since.

In 2008 some of us had written to Barbara Stocking, then Oxfam chief executive, objecting to a report that it sponsored, Rule of Rapists in Haiti, which labelled Haitians as rapists while hiding rapes by occupying UN forces. The year before, 114 soldiers had been sent home for raping women and girls, some as young as 11.… Read on ...

Stop the Deportations

CLS Meeting, Sunday 7th January at 12 noon till 2pm

We are increasingly concerned at the number of elderly people of Caribbean origin, who have lived and worked in Britain for many years, who are being threatened with deportation.
We are aware that it is not just a problem facing Caribbean people, but anyone who the government is pleased to label as “foreign”, including some EU citizens. We wish to start a debate on how best to campaign to support those of all communities who are currently being threatened with expulsion.

Speaker: Michelline Ngongo

Islington Pensioners Forum
1A Providence Court,
Providence Place,
London N1 0RN

Read on ...

No justice, no peace – will ZOSO have any long-term effect?

In a 2016 update, INDECOM boss, Terrence Williams, usefully invokes Peter Tosh – “I don’t want no peace; I want equal rights and justice” . Rather than an ephemeral “peace” that comes from oppressive and arbitrary state agents, the solution to crime must be justice, says Williams. But what hope when ‘the Ministry of Justice has for 2016-17 been allocated just over $6 billion. The Ministry of National Security received almost 10 times that amount’.

ZOSO may lead temporarily to more a peaceful Mount Salem in St. James as the guns move elsewhere, but the root of the problem will remain, that is injustice in its wider social and economic (not just legal) sense.… Read on ...

STOP BAUXITE MINING IN THE COCKPIT COUNTRY!

Jamaica’s Cockpit Country is under immediate threat from bauxite mining, which would remove forest cover, block and pollute waterways, displace residents, threaten agricultural livelihoods, compromise air quality and threaten the health and well-being of thousands of Jamaican citizens.

The Cockpit Country is an irreplaceable region of limestone forest supporting a unique flora and fauna. In addition, and importantly, it is the major aquifer for rivers rising and flowing both to the north and southern coasts of the island. These rivers are associated with extensive cave systems which would also be lost or damaged by the proposed mining activities. In many cases knowledge of the underground connections of these river caves is fragmentary, thus making the impacts of mining activities on regional water supplies problematic.… Read on ...

‘1.5°C to stay alive’: climate change, imperialism and justice for the Caribbean

In the wake of the two recent hurricanes that have devastated parts of the Caribbean, Leon Sealey-Huggins of Warwick University has published an excellent article in Third World Quarterly. In the wake of the two recent hurricanes that have devastated parts of the Caribbean, Leon Sealey-Huggins of Warwick University has published an excellent article in Third World Quarterly. “What has happened this year has been terrible to watch,” says Dr Sealey-Huggins, “and what is of immediate concern now is the clear-up operation. There is a need for fast and direct help and support from the world. But it is also crucial that we take time now to set this in a wider historical and political context and listen to the Caribbean region – otherwise these kind of events will just keep happening in same, or worse, pattern of repeats,” he states.… Read on ...

Tivoli Gardens Massacre

On 24 May 2010, Jamaican police and military initiated a joint operation in the West Kingston community of Tivoli Gardens, to arrest Christopher Coke, wanted in the USA for drug and arm-trafficking charges. During the first two days of the operation, at least 74 people, including a member of the Jamaica Defence Force, were killed and at least 54 people injured. More than 40 of those killed in Tivoli Gardens are alleged to have been the victims of extra-judicial executions by the security forces. Two people reportedly taken into custody remain unaccounted for and may have been victims of enforced disappearance.… Read on ...